It’s been 30 years since The Smiths bowed out, but their legacy isn’t determined the albums they continue to sell, the once teenage commiserators to Mancunian misery who still sport a Moz-inspired quiff or even that perfectly timed profile that pops up every so often to remind us why we fell in love with the band way back when, and why they’re still as important and influential as ever . . .

Their legacy lies in gigs just like this; The Smiths Ltd encapsulate the sound, style and satire that made Morrissey great (complete with gladiolis in pocket), and deliver the songs that saved our lives with the moving momentum that made The Smiths unique; their setlist initially disguised itself as typical with the signature songs and mainstream singles taking priority including, “Panic”, “This Charming Man”, “Girlfriend In A Coma” and “There Is A Light That Never Goes Out”, however, a sharp U-turn thrown in every track or so  of less obvious tracks, a la, “Reel Around The Fountain”,  kept the audience on their toes, and delighted them into the bargain.

By their own admission, the band endured an extensive search for their perfect Morrissey and it’s evident that it paid off with singer, Johnny Turner at the helm; he not only captures the distinct sound that made Morrissey an icon, but he embodies the flamboyant stage presence and sardonic manner that causes still our fascination with him today. The Smiths Ltd, as a unit, cement what made their heroes great; their tight delivery of classic songs give their audience something that seems a long time lost, but is still as important to them now as it was in the days of melting walkmans, double decker buses, tutu wearing Vicars and not having a stitch to wear.

If The Smiths Ltd are the musical equivalent of The Pied Piper, the different walks of people who packed out The Classic Grand in Glasgow last weekend, are the children who follow the music; the somewhat out of place crowd of guys in their mid 20s who invested their faith in Oasis only to be let down badly soaking up the classic songs that are like new friends to them, the middle aged couple with the wife replicating Morrissey’s quiff and glasses that she needs now more than she did then, swaying in time to the songs they bonded over as teenagers and the solo dancer, a balding man carrying a little extra weight these days but whose flouncing would make even Morrissey smile.

The Queen may be dead, but thanks to The Smiths Ltd, the band who told us so live on . . .

 

 

Related posts: